Raphi Giangiulio's Homemade Pipe Organ

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Organ of Douglas Fleischman

Douglas Fleischman completed his organ in 1996. He made the chest, action and casework. The pipes were obtained from an organ that was being replaced, and are considerably reworked from their original disposition. For instance, the Fifteeth was made from an Aeoline rank, which was cut down by half. The instrument is 5 ranks, single manual, with the manual permanently coupled to the pedal.

Here's the specification:

8'
4'
2 2/3'
2'
8'
Gedeckt
Octave
Nazard
Fifteenth
Oboe

Here are some photos of the organ. The two side towers and the central tower are speaking pipes from the 4' Octave. The two smaller towers are dummy pipes. The case is cherry, with basswood pipe shades and walnut stop knobs.

The music desk is book-matched tiger maple with walnut inlay. It has a cool holographic look when the light is just right.

The pipe shades are basswood. They are cut out with a scroll saw and then shaped with chisels. They were a lot of fun to make.

View showing the bottom 6 notes of the Gedeckt 8' speaking out the sides. The organ has a lot of 8' tone since I don't have a 16' pedal rank.

Pipes on the chest. From left to right (which is front to back) is the 8' Gedeckt, 4' Octave, 2 2/3, 2' Fifteenth and 8' Oboe. Note that the pallets are at the rear of the chest.

The stop action is a little weird. It uses a set of nested rollers to convey the movement forward. The stop knob pulls on a square that then moves the front end of the roller. This allows the sliders to be at about keyboard level.

View from the back of the case, showing the backfall, windchest and reservoir.

The manual-to-pedal coupler rollerboard.

A view showing the manual backfalls. A hinged fulcrum bar rests on top of the backfalls, allowing the action to stay tensioned. The chest is chromatic, so the action is kept as simple as possible.